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Entrepreneurs are the first to wake up and last to Sleep. Is this statement always true? Please share your thoughts and experiences. Giving examples will do a great deal, cheers

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An excellent leading question. I can affirm it is generally true, especially for startups.

Starting my enterprise was a logical extension of the work I had been doing for others in large corporations or as a single person contractor, so the transition seemed easy enough.

What I learned very quickly was the business planning, marketing and competitive analysis aspects of operating an enterprise, as opposed to negotiating single person efforts is a very personal thing when you are the owner.

Industry teaming, having others work for me and dealing as a company instead of a person were all challenges that fit your sleep profile description

One sleeps better later - with development, experience and time made available with success.

Report Kenneth's answer

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An entrepreneur’s personal and business goals are inextricably linked. Whereas the manager of a private company has a fiduciary responsibility to maximize value for shareholders, entrepreneurs build their businesses to fulfill personal goals and, if necessary, seek investors with similar goals. This is what gives entrepreneurs sleepless nights.

Before they can set goals for a business, entrepreneurs must be explicit about their personal goals. And they must periodically ask themselves if those goals have changed. Many entrepreneurs say that they are launching their businesses to achieve independence and control their destiny, but those goals are too vague. If they stop and think about it, most entrepreneurs can identify goals that are more specific.

Report Teddy's answer

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When it's someone else's business, you get to clock out. When it's yours? You never really get to fully clock out, however you can work towards being able to step away more to have more restful sleep (among other things). This is where management (as a domain of knowledge and experience) comes into play. The more you build up your team at all the levels, the more time you get to play with. That comes in forms of more work, focusing on the next moves to take, sleep, vacations, et cetera. If you continue to place yourself in a position to have to touch/handle everything, micromanage, fail to empower others in the right positions, et cetera - Then you continue to lose a lot of sleep, freedom, et cetera. It's hard to get to that point for many, as their business is so linked to the personal.

So, to recap - This isn't true. It's almost always true at the start of a business and the end of a business, however the middle (and hopefully ongoing) can regain more balance. Those who take too much time off at the beginning vs leveling up their knowledge, building the company, et cetera typically fail for many reasons. Those who don't learn to hand anything off, take the down time when possible, et cetera tend to burn out and struggle with a lot - Many may fail, others grow and begin to find better balance. It's wide ranging and always entertaining to watch entrepreneurs find their path, their ratio of work:life balance, management styles, et cetera.

TL;DR edition... No, not always true but typically true at certain phases.

Report Xavier's answer

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It's very true especially the first years of a business because one had to build strong foundation for your business as a result it will give sleepless nights. Lots of planning, implementation and reviews and the owners personal input will be very crucial.

Report Susan's answer

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Yes ,it is true. But acquiring managerial skills and mentorship can help alot hence you don't have to figure things out all by yourself. You can adapt shared past experiences and also employ skillful people to do your biddings.

Report Olufeyikemi's answer

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